SOUTHERN AFRICA AETHIOPIA INFERIOR, VEL EXTERIOR

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Very attractive map of southern Africa depicts the area just prior to the settlement of the Cape Province by the Dutch. The area shown is from the Congo River baisn around the Cape of Good Hope and up the east coast as far as northern present-day Mozambique. A good number of coastal names are given, including Mozambique Island which was an importaqnt re-supply point for ships sailing to India and points east. To the north, one of the Ptolemaic lakes thought to be the source of the Nile is shown. Information on the interior is sparse, reflecting the lack of knowledge the Europeans had about the interior of Africa. Unlike many other maps which are filled in with fanciful or fictitious information, this map more accurately portrays actual knowledge.ORIGINAL COLOUR.Very good condition

code : M1546

Cartographer : JANSSONIUS Johannes

Date : 1636c Amstersam,

Size : 39*51cms

availability : Sold

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Johannes Janssonius Jr. (1588-1664) was the son of the bookseller and publisher, Johannes Janssonius of Arnhem (ie. Janssonius, the elder). The elder Janssonius of Arnhem acted as co-publisher, with Cornelis Claesz, of the early editions of Hondius' "Atlas Minor".

Janssonius Jr. married Jodocus Hondius' daughter Elisabeth in 1612. From about 1633 onwards Janssonius' name and imprint started appearing on the Mercator/Hondius "Atlas ..." After 1636 the name of the "Atlas ..." was changed to "Atlas Novus "with Janssonius being responsible, in the main, for its publication.

The "Atlas Novus" was expanded by Janssonius over the years of its publication in an attempt to rival Blaeu's "Atlas Maior" for size and quality. Janssonius' "Atlas Novus" eventually comprised six volumes with a nautical atlas and an atlas of the ancient world included. The maps were relatively similar format to those of Blaeu, although a difference in style is certainly discernible.

Janssonius also issued an "Atlas Maior" of his own, again in competition with Blaeu, but this was not issued as regularly as the Blaeu version. The "Atlas Maior" comprised some ten volumes - eleven if the Cellarius celestial volume is included.